300 Days of Better Writing

August 28, 2014

Use concluding words to state your main point.


When you are writing a document to persuade your reader about an idea, you present your supporting ideas or evidence leading up to the main point. If you do this well, your reader will come to the same conclusion that you are trying to make.
To show that you have finished making your argument (i.e., completed writing about the reasons for your idea) and are about to state the main idea, you use a concluding word. A concluding word tells the reader, “Based on this information, I conclude that . . . .” Sample concluding words and phrases are thus, therefore, in conclusion, and as a consequence.
These concluding words provide a signpost for the reader. They say, “I’m done giving the evidence, and now I’m going to tell you the idea that I want you to believe.”
You may be able to make your main point without them. However, they are very effective for helping the reader identify what it is you want them to understand.

Free E-book to Improve Your Writing Skills

Top writing strategies and expert instruction from
each of Precise Edit’s writing guides

  • 1 critical article from
    Precise Edit Training Manual
  • 8 days of instruction from
    300 Days of Better Writing
  • 5 top strategies from
    Bang! Writing with Impact
  • 2 essential word choices from Which Word Do I Use?
  • 1 major comma use from Zen Comma
  • 1 section on main verbs from Concise Guide to Technical and Academic Writing
  • Essential Writing Skills series features two short guides:

    “Perfect Paragraphs and Super Sentences” and “Strategies for Concise Writing.”

Get the free e-book (PDF) OR

Purchase the Kindle version ($0.99).

Advertisements

February 7, 2014

From Bad to Good-Technical and Academic Writing


Academic and technical writing are far different than literary writing, such as novels and poetry. The primary purpose of academic and technical writing is to provide information about a defined topic to a specific audience. Whether you write graduate papers, professional journal articles, dissertations, white papers, manuals, websites, reviews, or similar documents, you are writing academic or technical documents.

Academic and technical writing can be bad writing. They can be complicated, tedious, and confusing. They can be terribly boring. Unfortunately, bad academic and technical writing is common (which makes bad writers nearly indistinguishable from their crowd of peers).

Why do people write badly? Possibly, they think the writing is supposed to be dull and confusing, or perhaps they think it sounds more professional. Maybe they have read a lot of poor writing, so when they review their writing, it sounds “right.”

On the other hand, academic and technical writing can be good writing. They can be clear and straightforward, logical, persuasive, and useful. They can be wonderfully interesting. Unfortunately, good writing is uncommon (which makes good writers stand out from their peers).  (more…)

November 21, 2013

Don’t place a comma between the subject and predicate, part 1.


Every complete sentence has a subject and predicate. We have used the term subject many times, but you may not be familiar with the term predicate. Basically, the predicate is the main verb in the sentence and everything that modifies or extends it. Consider this sentence.

“The man with the broken nose stumbled on the broken flagstone.”

The simple subject is “man,” and the entire subject of the sentence is “The man with the broken nose.” The main verb is “stumbled,” and the predicate is “stumbled on the broken flagstone.”

According to this tip, you should not place a comma between the subject and predicate. While this seems pretty obvious with the simple sentence above, I see many clients put a comma there when the subject is complicated. Consider this sentence.

“When the following morning finally arrived, the president of the bank that collapsed when the stock market tumbled was found dead.”

Here, the subject ends with “stock market tumbled,” and the predicate is “was found dead.” Due to the complexity of the subject, with its multiple phrases and clauses, some writers will put a comma after “tumbled.” Regardless of the sentence’s complexity, however, no comma is needed there.


This is the strategy for day 210 in 300 Days of Better Writing, available at Hostile Editing in PDF, Kindle, and paperback formats.

For a sample of 300 Days of Better Writing and other books by Precise Edit, download the free ebook.

June 17, 2013

Use thesis statements to introduce topics.


A thesis statement is a sentence or two that informs the reader about the main issue, topic, or idea about which you will write. They are necessary for effective communication.

In an academic essay, the thesis usually appears in the first paragraph, and it may state in obvious terms what idea you will discuss. An academic essay generally only has one thesis statement. For example, an academic essay may contain the thesis statement

“Pollution levels in Beijing have created major health concerns for residents”

and then continue to discuss the pollution levels, the effects of pollution on health in general, and the effect of pollution on Beijing residents.

Thesis statements are necessary in the “real world,” as well. They help the reader understand the purpose and theme of the upcoming text. A document may have several thesis statements, depending on its length and purpose. A formal letter may have only one main topic. A request for proposals may have a different thesis statement for each major section. Even a novel has a thesis statement: the introduction of the central conflict in the plot.

Thesis statements are important for two reasons.

  1. They give focus and direction to the writer. This helps you write a better organized and more cohesive document.
  2. They help the reader understand and mentally organize the content. This improves your communication.

Questions to consider: What is the main idea or topic of the document or document section? Do you state this idea or topic clearly?


Free E-book to Improve Your Writing Skills

Top writing strategies and expert instruction from
each of Precise Edit’s writing guides

  • 1 critical article from
    Precise Edit Training Manual
  • 8 days of instruction from
    300 Days of Better Writing
  • 5 top strategies from
    Bang! Writing with Impact
  • 2 essential word choices from Which Word Do I Use?
  • 1 major comma use from Zen Comma
  • 1 section on main verbs from Concise Guide to Technical and Academic Writing

Get the free e-book (PDF) OR

Purchase the Kindle version ($0.99).

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.